SQL Server with Cluster Shared volumes (CSV) – Part 2

In the previous part of this series, we have seen what a cluster shared volume is and what are the advantages and other considerations to keep in mind when deploying CSVs for SQL Server workloads. In this article, I will walk though actual installation of a failover cluster Instance leveraging CSVs.

To begin with, I will walk you through my cluster setup from 20,000 foot view. I created two brand new VMs running windows server 2012 R2 and renamed them accordingly. Nothing special w.r.t disk drives at this point, Just basic VMs with a system drive(C$).

I also created 2 virtual networks in my VMWare workstation which I will be using for configuring my Public and private NICs on my nodes.

On my first node:

192.168.1.100 is the IPv4 address of my DNS server and below are my NIC settings.

Once IP address has been configured, below is how I joined my node to domain (sqltrek.local in my case).

Further reading: Deploy SQL with CSVs – Part 2

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SQL Server 2016 Cluster setup – What’s changed?

In this short blog post let’s take a screenshots tour of SQL Server 2016 Failover cluster installation and see if Microsoft made any significant changes to the setup process.

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In the above two screenshots, I’ve provided my VNN and Instance name for SQL.

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Add your Disks as needed.

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provide your IP address.

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Enter your Service accounts.

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Select your Database directories accordingly and go to TempDB tab to check SQL installation wizard creating tempdb data files based on the number of CPUs you have got.

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This is the first node of my cluster setup, hence you can see PRDSQLTREKA as the only node listed in the above screenshot. Next Next Done.

Now on the second node:

Select Add node to SQL Server Failover cluster and Next-Next-Next, provide service account and done.

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Basically nothing has been changed specific to Cluster setup. If you are comfortable with earlier cluster setups, then you should be golden. Cheers!